The Edinburgh Press | An emotional crowd greets the Queen’s coffin in Edinburgh





(Edinburgh) She only saw Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin for a few seconds, but Christine Raeburn couldn’t hold back her tears as the royal funeral procession made its way through the streets of Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, on Sunday afternoon.

Updated yesterday at 3:24pm.

Isabella Duca

Isabella Duca
The press

“It was sad and poignant. We’ll never see such a gorgeous lady again,” the mother of the family said, eyes still red, minutes after the convoy drove by. “Scotland was important to her and it is very touching that she is returning to her residence in Edinburgh for the last time so that the Scots can say goodbye to her. »


PHOTO ISABELLE DUCAS, THE PRESS

Christine Raiburn

Like Christine Raeburn, tens of thousands had gathered to meditate along the route that took the seven-car procession 300 kilometers between the Balmoral domain, where the sovereign died on Thursday, and the Palace of Holyroodhouse, his official residence , traveled in the Scottish capital.

Some applauded as the procession passed. Others threw flowers.


PHOTO ANDREW MILLIGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thousands of people gathered along the route in a collected silence.

The Queen’s remains were transported by a glazed hearse in a coffin covered with the Scottish royal standard and surmounted by a wreath of white flowers.

Blaine Webster, wearing the traditional Scottish kilt and beret for the occasion, came to pay a final tribute to the one who ruled the nation for more than 70 years and also had his eyes watered during the funeral procession. “I’m a traditionalist, so the monarchy is important to me. And today we experienced a historic moment,” he said, moved.


PHOTO ISABELLE DUCAS, THE PRESS

Michal Banszak, Paulina Wojciewska and their daughters Amalia and Zuzanna

Paulina Wojciewska and Michal Banszak are confident that their daughters Amalia, 7, and Zuzanna, 5, will remember this milestone for the rest of their lives. The family arrived early to get a good vantage point. For the occasion, the youngest wore a hoop adorned with a crown and brought along a Paddington Bear stuffed animal (who was linked to the Queen after Her Majesty appeared in a comedy skit with the teddy bear).

What will Paulina Wojciewska remember most about Elizabeth II? Their colorful outfits and their hats from another time. “She had a lot of style! “M started.me Wojciewska.

The end of an era

“It’s the death of an icon and the end of an era,” said Linda Thomson, whose dog Belle was dressed for the occasion in a costume: a Union Jack collar and mock kilt on the hindquarters. “I’ve always loved the royal family and the queen’s dogs,” she added.


PHOTO ISABELLE DUCAS, THE PRESS

Linda Thompson

Like many others present, Nicola Sandilands had brought flowers to lay in front of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. She included a note: “Your Majesty, you always had a place in your heart for Scotland and Scotland will always love you too. »

Emotions also gripped Rona Fuller after the Queen’s coffin disappeared behind the gates of Holyroodhouse Palace. “She has never failed in her task in 70 years,” she remarked. “We feel like we just lost a friend. »

After waiting four hours for the funeral procession to pass on Sunday, Mme Fuller also intended to be present on Monday when the royal remains are taken to St Giles Cathedral for a religious ceremony after spending the night in Holyroodhouse’s Throne Room.


PHOTO OWEN HUMPHREYS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Flag of Scotland, leaves Balmoral Castle for Edinburgh.

For this one-kilometer journey, King Charles III. and other members of the royal family expected to join the procession.

Elizabeth II’s coffin must remain in the burning chapel at the cathedral for 24 hours so that Scots can go there and pray.

It will then be transported by plane to London, where it will also be accessible to the public. His funeral will take place on September 19 at Westminster Abbey, a mecca for royal weddings, coronations and burials for nearly a millennium.

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