Nostalgic for the 2000s? Nice ? | The press

In the early 2000s, there was Britney Spears, the glossy lipstick, the bright colors, the crop top. It was also the time of CDs, DVDs and Co anger. Are we already nostalgic for that time when we lived without social networks?

Posted yesterday at 11am

Olivia Levy

Olivia Levy
The press

Catherine Forget, 29, and Frédérique Paré, 28, founded Québec Nostalgie, an Instagram account with more than 80,000 subscribers, in 2019. They’re nostalgic for the 2000s, CDs, DVDs, the show In a galaxy near youand the greatest creative sloppiness that characterized this era.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY TVA FILMS

Mélanie Maynard, Guy Jodoin, Claude Legault, Sylvie Moreau and Stéphane Crête in a scene from the film In a galaxy near you

“We made this page to remember the good old days and it feels good! Nostalgia is a calming feeling that connects us. Makes you realize we’ve all been through things together, we’ve worn low-rise jeans, we’ve watched Ramdam. This creates positive conversations in a caring atmosphere. I think we needed that,” explains Catherine Forget.

There is something comforting about nostalgia for Emmanuelle Fantin, a professor and researcher at the Sorbonne University. “Studies show that watching a TV show related to childhood acts as a depressant and makes us feel good,” she says.


PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

Catherine Forget and Frédérique Paré, creators of the Quebec Nostalgie Instagram account

Frédérique Paré regrets the fragmented side of the 2000s: “We tried many things in all universes. Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera defined the candy-pop era, the looks were colorful, the accessories overlapped, the plastic bracelets… while today we all dress the same,” she notes.

Madeleine Goubau, lecturer at the ESG UQAM School of Fashion, acknowledges that the 2000s were defined by rhinestones, sequins and shine. “There was this festive and boisterous side. Young people didn’t know that time, but they are adopting the fashion of those years that seem so far away! There is a page vintage wear Crop TopsLow-rise pants with the line what excels! We even see the reappearance of necklaces made from small plastic beads,” she notes.

“You don’t have to have experienced an era to be nostalgic, because nostalgia is a process of idealizing the past,” emphasizes Emmanuelle Fantin.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY EMMAUELLE FANTIN

Emmanuelle Fantin, professor and researcher at the Sorbonne University

What we regret when we’re nostalgic isn’t just the past, it’s a whole notion of distance, the distance from home, from childhood, materialized by something we can’t find anymore: the past.

Emmanuelle Fantin, professor and researcher at the Sorbonne University

Regret a not so distant past

And why be nostalgic for a time that is actually not that far away from us?

“There was a big technological break between the 2000s and today. There have been many changes, CDs and DVDs have disappeared, social networks have been born. We are really somewhere else, we consume television, cinema, music differently. It was the last decade before the digital age. So we feel like the 2000s are further away, even if it’s only been 20 years,” says Catherine Forget.

“What is new is that digital technology has greatly accelerated the phenomenon of nostalgia and it is therefore normal for us to remember earlier times. There is a social acceleration of lived time, a technological acceleration and compression of time, which means we can be nostalgic for an ever younger time,” observes Emmanuelle Fantin.

According to Katharina Niemeyer, Professor at UQAM’s School of Media and co-author of Contemporary nostalgia (with Emmanuelle Fantin) Nostalgia is cyclical, but there is a before and after 2.0, signifying the arrival of the new generation of technologies, a crucial time that changed everything.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY KATHARINA NIEMEYER

Katharina Niemeyer, Professor at the School of Media at UQAM

Everything went slower in the 2000s, today we want to do more things in less time, have more and more intense experiences. Before social media, we weren’t in this dynamic and we didn’t share everything we did.

Katharina Niemeyer, Professor at the School of Media at UQAM

“There is now an overabundance of information,” says the professor. Many young people born to the Internet are nostalgic for the days when it didn’t exist, which they didn’t experience. That nostalgia is real when you see the success of the series, for example stranger things. »

Catherine Forget and Frédérique Paré continue to passionately maintain their Quebec Nostalgie Instagram account. “This nostalgia makes you think about the past, wondering if things were better before. Have we evolved? We measure socially where we stand… Anyway, we understood the power of nostalgia. »


PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, ARCHIVE LA PRESSE

Singer Britney Spears in Montreal on May 17, 2000

Idealize the past

However, Emmanuelle Fantin warns young people who say life used to be so much better. “It’s about choosing a reading of the past that doesn’t take into account the disadvantages of the same time. It’s like throwing the past into a sieve to keep only the best, it’s the fantasy of the past,” she says.

She also observes that the social climate characterized by political uncertainty promotes nostalgia. “The world is getting harder. The more society is in crisis, the greater the nostalgia. At the moment, between the war in Ukraine, the pandemic and the climate problems that are shaking society, we take refuge in nostalgia. The professor believes that nostalgia is a new way of life and that this trend will increase because there will also be a before and after in relation to the pandemic.

“Nostalgia also enables us to overcome the crisis. Not only is it a sanctuary, it can also be very creative. There is this worry about the future, there are people who are more nostalgic than others, more melancholic. It’s part of life, it’s normal,” believes Professor Katharina Niemeyer.

What shaped the 2000s

  • Star Academy.  It all began on February 16, 2003. During this first gala, we discovered the 14 participants of the Star Académie, including Marie-Mai, Wilfred LeBouthillier, Marie-Élaine Thibert and sisters Annie and Suzie Villeneuve.  Not to mention the title track, And it's not over, which we sang for months!  A phenomenal success, hosted by Julie Snyder, who made the history of Quebec television.

    PHOTO MARTIN CHAMBERLAND, ARCHIVE LA PRESSE

    Star Academy. It all started on February 16th, 2003. During this first gala we discovered the 14 participants of Star Academy, including Marie-Mai, Wilfred LeBouthillier, Marie-Élaine Thibert and sisters Annie and Suzie Villeneuve. Not to mention the title track And it’s not over yet that we sang for months! A phenomenal success, hosted by Julie Snyder, who made the history of Quebec television.

  • The iPod.  This digital music player has revolutionized the way we consume music.  Apple released the iPod on October 23, 2001 and has sold over 450 million units worldwide.  The end of production of the device was announced on May 10th.

    PHOTO ARCHIVE PRESS

    The iPod. This digital music player has revolutionized the way we consume music. Apple released the iPod on October 23, 2001 and has sold over 450 million units worldwide. The end of production of the device was announced on May 10th.

  • The clamshell phone.  It was our first cell phone, it was beautiful, it was so modern.  He was close to our hearts and we were proud of him!  More than 20 years later, it makes a comeback with Samsung's Galaxy Z Flip model, in a much more polished version of course!

    PHOTO ARCHIVE PRESS

    The clamshell phone (tip). It was our first cell phone, it was beautiful, it was so modern. He was close to our hearts and we were proud of him! More than 20 years later, it makes a comeback with Samsung’s Galaxy Z Flip model, in a much more polished version of course!

  • Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera.  It was Baby One More Time, Oops!

    PHOTO ANDRÉ PICHETTE, LA PRESSE ARCHIVE

    Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. It was the time of darling, one more time, Oops! I said it again and Poisonous who made Britney Spears a superstar, as did Christina Aguilera (pictured) with songs like I turn to you and lady jam. Since then, the two stars have rid themselves of the childish image of the all-new Mickey Mouse Club and have become pop divas with outfits that are always provocative.

  • Live life.  Created by Stéphane Bourguignon, this drama series marked the beginning of the 2000s and became a cult.  We follow the lives of five friends in their thirties, played by Patrick Labbé, Macha Limonchik, Vincent Graton, Julie McClemens and Normand Daneau.  La vie la vie is spot on and describes very well the intimate concerns of these characters of the time, as well as their beautiful friendship bond, hence the immense success of the series.

    PHOTO SUPPLIED BY RADIO-CANADA, LA PRESSE ARCHIVE

    Live life. Created by Stéphane Bourguignon, this drama series marked the beginning of the 2000s and became a cult. We follow the lives of five friends in their thirties, played by Patrick Labbé, Macha Limonchik, Vincent Graton, Julie McClemens and Normand Daneau. Live life is spot on and describes very well the intimate concerns of these characters of the time as well as their beautiful friendship relationship, hence the immense success of the series.

  • Low rise jeans.  It was never unanimous, but it was the essential of the 2000s: low-waist jeans are everywhere, even if they often reveal the stomach, buttocks or thong.  Britney Spears, Paris Hilton and many others are adopting this hyper-sexualized fashion, much to the despair of parents of teenage girls.

    PHOTO ARCHIVE PRESS

    Low rise jeans. It was never unanimous, but it was the essence of the 2000s. Low-waist jeans are everywhere, even if they often expose the stomach, buttocks, or tummy line. Britney Spears, Paris Hilton and many others are adopting this hyper-sexualized fashion, much to the despair of parents of teenage girls.

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Where does nostalgia come from?

“Nostalgia was originally thought of as a disease. in the XVIIe In the 19th century, a Swiss doctor, Johannes Hofer, observed that when Swiss soldiers left their country far, they developed symptoms such as depression and anorexia, and he attributed them to the fact that they were far from their homeland. He called this disease nostalgia ; in Greece, nostosit’s homecoming, and Algie, the pain, the fact that you are ill when you are away from home, from your home country,” explains Emmanuelle Fantin, lecturer at the Sorbonne University. “Nostalgia existed before, but the word as such did not exist. At the turn of the 20the At the beginning of the 20th century, nostalgia gradually lost this geographical anchor, the fact of being far from one’s homeland, to denote a malaise linked to the loss of a past that will never return. It is no longer a disease but a feeling that we can all experience. »

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