Documentary: Lucien Francoeur talks about his daughter Virginie

Professor and writer Virginie Francoeur, daughter of poet-rocker Lucien Francoeur, will explore the many facets of her father in a documentary filmed in California this fall.


Virginie Francoeur is also a poet, novelist and essayist.

Photo by Andre Boucher

Virginie Francoeur is also a poet, novelist and essayist.

For this feature film, which recently received production support from SODEC, Virginie and Lucien Francoeur take on a.o Excursion from Los Angeles to San Francisco, on the mythical Route 101. The goal of this journey: to enable Lucien Francoeur to reconnect with his creation myths.

“My father wrote about thirty books and his poetry was strongly influenced by Americanism,” explains Virginie Francoeur in an interview.

“When he was young, he ran away and went to the Summer of Love in San Francisco. He was influenced by Jim Morrison the lizard king and Jack Kerouac… He always talks to me about his On road, which he could never write. Maybe California will give him a taste for writing again… I also want to use this father-daughter trip to dare questions that have remained somewhat unanswered before it’s too late.”

to say urgency

For this first film experience, Virginie Francoeur can count on the expertise of Robbie Hart, a director specializing in rock documentaries. It was producers Yves Bisaillon and Christian Medawar who approached her to co-direct the feature film with Hart.

“They’ve wanted to do a film about my father for a long time,” says the author, who makes a living as a professor of change management at Polytechnique.

“But once I started the project, we changed the focus of the documentary. It became Lucien through his daughter’s eyes. We will go beyond a simple biography of my father.”


Virginie Francoeur says she always had a close relationship with her father.

Photo by Andre Boucher

Virginie Francoeur says she always had a close relationship with her father.

Virginie Francoeur says she always had a close relationship with her father, nurtured by their shared love of poetry. She was also raised in a family of writers as her mother, Claudine Bertrand, is also a poet.

“My parents had me when I was 39,” she says. At first Lucien didn’t want to be a father, but eventually he changed his mind and became a father hen. I’m his only child and I’ve really influenced his life path. He is a versatile man who has had many hats. But he’s also hypersensitive under a rocker shell.

“Today he lives a little more withdrawn, but he still fights with his inner demons. My father is my best friend, my mentor. I don’t want to lose him, but at the same time I know he’s not immortal. For this reason, the film begs to be told. It really is last call.”

  • The documentary will be in cinemas in 2024.

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