workshop shop mūz manufactures | The facility like nowhere else

In front of the door of the new mūz workshop boutique, Avenue Atateken, music invites strollers to cross the threshold. We do, fascinated, after a furtive look out the window. The place is cramped, filled with eclectic objects: a slightly eccentric mix that exudes joie de vivre and humor. It all clearly demonstrates a vision of design that refuses to take itself seriously…

Posted at 12:00 p.m

Isabelle Morin

Isabelle Morin
The press

We’re in the heart of designer and visual artist Nathalie Collet’s whimsical haunt. The designer presents her treasures anew with every object in a lively, elegant way. Here stuffed animals from Sweden meet ceramic vulvas. Ruffled animals are displayed on trays in a funky ‘Bridgerton’ style along the wall.

The odd fauna stares at the visitor, unless it’s the fine china, handmade soaps, or deliciously kitschy bathing caps the owner brought from Athens.

Styles and eras coexist in this eclectic hideaway – objects with different uses and prices, each with their own little story.

I like this mix of objects that have something unique.

Nathalie Collett

“When I come across an item that you don’t see in every household, I feel like I’ve made a discovery,” she says with obvious satisfaction. If it’s overrepresented in Montreal, I don’t do it. »

The sight of their sets and the special atmosphere that emanated from them encouraged those around them to go down this path. Thus the idea of ​​a warm workshop boutique that could bring together in one place a range of objects to offer or give away began to mature: a longtime dream for anyone who likes to play small at the retailer.

  • The whimsical trays from Ibride

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    The whimsical trays from Ibride

  • Kores swimming caps

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Kores swimming caps

  • Sarovki soft toys

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Sarovki soft toys

  • Mushkin pillow and jewelry

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Mushkin pillow and jewelry

  • Ibride animal furniture

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Ibride animal furniture

  • Gangzaï trays and trinkets go well with flea market furniture

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Gangzaï trays and trinkets go well with flea market furniture

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Nathalie Collet has not always given free rein to her artistic approach. As a “little girl from the mountains”, she tells of her childhood in a village in the Alps, this design came to life in another stratosphere. “It took me a long time to accept that I was an artist. » After studying marketing and a career in voice outshe dares.

Mūz is his playground and the fruit of his wanderings at flea markets, on the internet or while travelling. There she also mixes her talent with the local artisan. “My mother put everything she likes here and I like everything she offers,” says one of her four daughters, Coco, who joined this “Mūzéal” adventure this spring. At the back of the premises, in a small workshop, mother and daughter explore their artistic flair, the first in creations made from recycled materials and the second in a pop art style.

Most of the lights presented in the store are by Nathalie Collet. There are also a few pieces of furniture. The artist creates with whatever ignites a spark in her, which could just as easily be a truck bumper, a metal barrel, paper pulp, an exhaust pipe or faux fur. These recovered materials are reborn under his hand in canvases, stools, side tables or colossal suspensions.

  • Nathalie Collet in her studio

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Nathalie Collet in her studio

  • The naive characters in pulp signed by the plastic artist

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    The naive characters in pulp signed by the plastic artist

  • Large format lighting by Nathalie Collet

    PHOTO MORGANE SCHOCK, THE PRESS

    Large format lighting by Nathalie Collet

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Today Nathalie Collet works with pulp on canvas. “I take it and then, without thinking, put it down. It’s a total abstraction of the spirit and of what I was able to learn artistically,” she describes while handling the material. The exercise produces childish characters that caught the eye of the fair jury Together we art, which will be presented in New York this fall. “I could never have imagined that it would be exhibited in a prestigious location,” she says enthusiastically.

Above all, the designer describes herself as a creator and as one of those who sees beauty everywhere… Even in a car spring, which, once transformed into a bedside table, continues to exist in an unusual way. “Creativity has never left me. There is always a solution to a problem. And in the end it’s good! »

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