Pont de Québec: “It’s time to stop fooling around,” says Marchand

Mayor Bruno Marchand’s patience on the Quebec Bridge file is running out. “It’s about time it stopped being silly,” he says.

• Also read: Quebec Bridge Takeover: Quebec Blocks Ottawa-CN Agreement

The Mayor of Quebec is urging the parties to come to terms as a new impasse appears in this saga. Citizens are “tanned” that this “gem” is allowed to wither after more than 15 years of discussion and need to be “reassured”.

“There is something that doesn’t work,” denounced Mr. Marchand on the sidelines of the announcement of the first laboratory school in Limoilou.

Radio-Canada reported Thursday morning that the federal government has found common ground with Canadian National (CN) to buy back the rusting infrastructure that requires hundreds of millions of dollars in repair work, but that the Legault government would have put the brakes on for an unknown reason .

Mayor Marchand is cautious, saying he doesn’t know if the state of Quebec is responsible for this blockade and refuses to speculate on his motives, if any, stressing he’s not at the negotiating table.

“I can’t know who blocks, who doesn’t block,” but “People [ne] don’t elect us to make speeches, to block,” he elevates.

“There’s something that doesn’t make sense. So, I what I say to the politicians there: manage to deliver results,” he stresses.

“What we’re hearing is that CN is willing to sign an agreement and make sure we get our hands on this bridge and do something extraordinary with it. Good, [ne] Let’s not let the opportunity slip, I think, ”he analyzes.

transparency

It is clear to Mayor Marchand that the future of the two historic bridges and the Quebec-Lévis tunnel project must be treated separately.

He calls for transparency and public education about the “plan” for the renovation of the Quebec Bridge, but also of the Pierre Laporte Bridge, whose lines are reaching the end of their useful life, in order to ensure the longest possible lifespan of these critical infrastructures in the western part of the world City.

“Whether we are for or against the third link, we need our two bridges. It doesn’t change. So we have to take care of them. […]You have to make sure they last, you have to make sure you are able to be transparent [avec] of the population,” pleads the mayor.

If the Third Link project “can be part of the solution” to the fluidity of travel, it’s up to the CAQ to “demonstrate it with” conclusive evidence,” he reiterates.

Dynamic Ways

On the other hand, the mayor wants to clarify whether or not it is possible to set up dynamic management of the lanes of the Pierre Laporte bridge, since the question currently remains “open”.

Remember that Transport Minister François Bonnardel rejected this idea in 2021 because he felt it was too expensive and complex. However, it will be analyzed as part of the opportunity study on the Quebec-Lévis tunnel project expected in early 2023, his ministry announced this week.

“If it’s possible, I think there’s certainly a way to study,” affirms the mayor. And if, as we found out yesterday [mercredi], it is true that there is no recent report stating that this is not possible. Now why are we told that this is not possible? concludes Mr. Marchand.

“Unfair,” said Lehouillier

For his part, Lévis Mayor Gilles Lehouillier regretted that the Quebec Bridge file was “stripping” and said he was “surprised” to learn that the Quebec federal government was asking for “new terms,” ​​that is, an additional one have contribution of 350 million US dollars.

“I think the Quebec government is doing its bit. […] It’s not loose change. […] It strikes us as completely unfair compared to other infrastructure that is 100% maintained by the federal government,” he said.

According to him, it is up to the Trudeau government to “deliver the goods” since it pledged to settle the issue in 2015.

— With TVA Nouvelles

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