Osheaga Festival | Seven highlights

The Montreal gathering returned this year in its usual format. The fallout from the pandemic is still being felt (particularly on traffic), but the music weekend has been generous in terms of highlights. Our journalists were present for the three days of the festival. Report on seven highlights of this 15e Anniversary.

Posted yesterday at 7:00am

Intoxicating Dua Lipa


PHOTO OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRESS

Dua Lipa in concert, Sunday night

Marissa Groghe

Marissa Groghe
The press

It was the grand finale that we were impatiently waiting for, even though she had just brought her tour nostalgia of the future at the Bell Center. Dua Lipa did not disappoint. She blinded us. The production of his show was breathtaking. The Brit was surrounded by an arsenal of dancers, musicians and choristers. Dua Lipa is made to be on stage, she knows how to make her audience have a good time. The whole thing seems effortless, but it’s clear that the effort that goes into this show is gigantic (just in executing such a complex staging). That says it all, if she came back to Montreal for the third time next week we’d be there!

No break with Apashe


PHOTO OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRESS

Apashe on stage on Sunday night

Marissa Groghe

Marissa Groghe
The press

For his first major show at a Quebec festival, the Belgian Montreal artist was fantastic. He spared no expense in bringing his classically inspired electronic music to the stage. He drew up a roster that rattled the crowd gathered in front of him. On one of the site’s more secluded stages, on the banks of the river, he surrounded himself with a horn section of eight musicians, with a screen behind him that accompanied his live film score with images or lyrics. A number of guests also joined the party: KROY, Geoffroy, Lia, Wasiu and Ymir. At 7pm, under the setting sun but still high in the sky, the crowd danced and jumped on a wild midnight-like evening.

The thrill of Arcade Fire


PHOTO SARAH MONGEAU-BIRKETT, THE PRESS

Arcade Fire’s Win Butler (from behind) at the Osheaga Festival on Friday night

Emily Cote

Emily Cote
The press

We’ve seen Arcade Fire perform many times, but never have our arms trembled so much with the shudders of the group that has been the pride of Montreal for nearly 20 years. Is it because of Osheaga’s enforced three-year hiatus due to the pandemic? Countless fiery anthems by the extended family band of Win Butler and Régine Chassagne? Maybe. But rarely have we seen the members of the clan so intense, committed and above all emotional on stage. To wink at the album’s title track The suburbs (Winner of Album of the Year at the Grammys, we must remind you) that the passage of time will not change the sense of great rock intensity we felt on Friday night.

Arkells offers a classic


PHOTO PATRICK BEAUDRY BY OSHEAGA FACEBOOK PAGE

Arkells concert in Osheaga, Saturday

William Theriault

William Theriault
special cooperation

At the beginning of Saturday evening, Arkells made himself heard Give me! Give me! Give me! (A man after midnight), ABBA’s monster success, to the festival-goers. From the first notes of the mythical song, thousands of arms were raised in the air and hundreds of people rushed to the main stage to celebrate with the Ontario rock group. It’s a moment that words can’t do justice enough: Impossible to have chills on the spot or even an urgent desire to go dancing.

Returning to the roots of Tones and I


PHOTO SARAH MONGEAU-BIRKETT, THE PRESS

Osheaga crowd, Friday

William Theriault

William Theriault
special cooperation

“When I wasn’t making music for a living and was only playing on the street for passers-by, I used to sing the same song over and over again. On Friday afternoon, in the early hours of the festival, singer Tones and I created a moment that was both touching and moving. “I promised myself I’d sing it at every show I did. So here is my version of forever Young She smiled. Clearly happy, the 21-year-old Australian interpreted the success of Alphaville brilliantly – and above all emotionally.

Packages, the happy mix

Emily Cote

Emily Cote
The press

The country of Australia and the music genre disco don’t necessarily go together, but that’s what makes Parcels special. Of course, the quintet also swims in rock, as the vocal harmonies of the two singers Noah Hill and Patrick Hetherington lend a touch of psychedelia to the group’s exquisite musical cocktail. On Friday, as the late afternoon sun scorched the Green stage, Parcels’ music, both soaring and dancing, had the perfect level of frenzy. Those who have never visited Osheaga should know that the Green Stage, bordered by the natural amphitheater of the Plaine des Jeux, enjoys the view of the Jacques Cartier Bridge in the background. It is to be seen once in a lifetime!

The Canadian premiere of Wet Leg


PHOTO OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRESS

Wet Leg live on Sunday

Marissa Groghe

Marissa Groghe
The press

The British duo Wet Leg convinces on record. His self-titled album, released in April, wreaked havoc in the music world. The enthusiasm is so great that Hester and Rhian are in demand all over the world. Her performance in Osheaga was her first in Canada. We couldn’t wait to see this new music phenomenon live. If we didn’t leave disappointed, we would remain dissatisfied. Though instrumentally solid, Hester, Rhian and their group lacked energy on stage early in the show, when their indie rock is often snappy despite an already conquered audience. Conclusion: an up and down that we prefer to remember the good times, because there were many of them.

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