Marc Seguin | Ateliers 3333 are full!

Les Ateliers 3333 – the creation of dozens of artists’ studios at 3333, Boulevard Crémazie, in Montreal, in a former industrial building – is a success across the board. A year after the start of the project by the painter Marc Séguin, all the rooms are rented. We visited some artists who just moved there.

Posted at 6:00 am

Eric Clemens

Eric Clemens
The press

Sculptor Pascale L’Italy shares a 1035 square foot space at Ateliers 3333⁠2 with eight other artists including Bryan Beyung, Frédérique Laliberté, Évelyne Allaire and Ian MacLeod. “We all have different schedules, so there are rarely more than two of us here at a time,” she said. Before that we stayed in the old Cadbury factory for two and a half years. We got kicked out with rent increases. A total of 29% increase since we arrived. So we moved here. We don’t regret it. It’s bigger, nicer and cleaner! »

  • Pascale Italian

    PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

    Pascale Italian

  • Ian MacLeod shares a room with Pascale L'Italy.

    PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

    Ian MacLeod shares a room with Pascale L’Italy.

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Created by Marc Séguin, Société de développement Angus and promoter Huotco, Les Ateliers 3333 project consists of seven floors with 7 to 12 rooms per floor. There are many artists, more than 150, often several to rent the same space of 800 to 1000 square feet.⁠2. The 82 leases sold like hotcakes as demand is very strong. “There are definitely 700 workshops missing in Montreal,” says Marc Séguin, who is already looking for another building in Saint-Michel.


PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

Marc Seguin in front of Les Ateliers 3333

What sets Les Ateliers 3333 apart from other fine art buildings is, first of all, the very attractive rental price of $12 per square foot and the fact that rents only increase with inflation. Artist Cynthia Girard-Renard finds it reassuring to know she won’t be ousted any time soon, “even if it’s the ugliest place des arts in the world! “, She says.

“Right off the Metropolitan it looks like an apocalyptic scenario! It’s so polluted and brutalist, this highway. You never thought artists would be thrown into such ugly places. But hey, the neighborhood is super nice. It’s Saint Michael. There are plenty of grocery stores and a totally delicious Haitian restaurant, Pam Pi Bon! It’s a beautiful project, the 3333. I’m happy that my studio faces north. I don’t see the Metropolitan and there are beautiful sunsets. »


PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

Jerome Lavoie with Marc Seguin

Carpenter Jérôme Lavoie is also happy to be in Saint-Michel.

The big advantage I have here is that I no longer have the sword of Damocles on my head. I just have to focus on my business.

Marc Seguin, painter

But why carpenter? Isn’t the building just for visual artists? no Marc Séguin explains that there are some craftsmen in the building. “Artists may need a carpenter,” he says. When we were at 305 Bellechasse we had one carpenter per floor! »

The Giverny Capital Collection, owned by businessman François Rochon, even has a very large display area for his artworks. An exhibition is currently presenting creations by Folker de Jong, Sophie Jodoin, Edward Burtynsky, Hajra Waheed, Bill Viola, Magali Reus, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Kelly Richardson, Adad Hannah and Eduardo Basualdo. An appointment is required to visit the exhibition.

  • A drawing by artist Sophie Jodoin

    PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

    A drawing by artist Sophie Jodoin

  • On the left a work by Dutch artist Folker de Jong

    PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

    On the left a work by Dutch artist Folker de Jong

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Marc Séguin wants Les Ateliers 3333 to be a real community. In a few months, the private organization will be transformed into a foundation, allowing the artists to manage the building themselves. The organizers have already entrusted their direction to an artist and community specialist, Keithy Antoine.

It will enliven the places, organize exhibitions and open houses, especially during the autumn cultural days.

We want the artists to get to know each other and to involve people from the neighborhood in order to create a beautiful symbiosis. We will soon have a café, a shop for artists to sell goods and later a roof terrace.

Keith Antoine


PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

In September, the building will receive another makeover. All the windows will be replaced thanks to the collection of the first rents, says Marc Séguin. The second floor is being completed so that the last tenants can move in.

  • Pénélope and Chloé, two artists working with textiles, are now in Ateliers 3333.

    PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

    Pénélope and Chloé, two artists working with textiles, are now in Ateliers 3333.

  • Artist Marc-André Yonkers Vidal shares the space with Pénélope and Chloé.

    PHOTO MARCO CAMPANOZZI, THE PRESS

    Artist Marc-André Yonkers Vidal shares the space with Pénélope and Chloé.

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Marc Séguin has also reserved an area of ​​3000 square meters.⁠2 in the building, with great views of downtown, the Olympic Stadium and Mount Royal. He brought back works from his New York studio, which he will soon be closing after 16 years of presence. “I didn’t want to go there in the summer, it’s too hot and I set up a workshop on an island, so two workshops are enough. »

In addition to his concern to help up-and-coming artists and to set an example against speculation and excessive rent increases, Marc Séguin pursues his artistic path. He is currently preparing an animated film with 6900 of his drawings at the National Film Board. “It’s going to be a 12-minute short film,” he said. The story is already written. I have a team that I will go into production with in September. »

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