sanctions against Gazprom | The shipment of six turbines to Germany is spurned

(Ottawa, Montreal) Ukraine regrets the “dangerous precedent” set by Canada’s decision to allow Siemens to ship six turbines stuck in Montreal to Germany – a breach by Ottawa of its own sanctions regime against Moscow. Canadian-Ukrainians are also angry, and they expressed it in Montreal, where dozens of them gathered in front of Siemens’ offices.

Posted at 1:21 p.m

Melanie Marchese

Melanie Marchese
The press

Vincent Larin

Vincent Larin
The press

In a lengthy statement released on Sunday, Kyiv expressed “deep disappointment” over Ottawa’s announcement on Saturday that half a dozen turbines for Russia’s Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline can be shipped to Germany.

“This dangerous precedent violates international solidarity, contradicts the rule of law and will have only one consequence: it will increase Moscow’s sense of impunity,” the Ukrainian foreign and energy ministries lamented.

Especially since “Russia can deliver gas to Germany in full even without the documents” and his request is nothing more than “blackmail without technical justification,” it continues.

Ukraine had urged Ottawa not to comply with Berlin’s request, but the scales finally tipped in Germany’s favour: Canada’s Minister for Natural Resources, Jonathan Wilkinson, issued a “revocable and temporary permit” for the delivery of the turbines.

We’ve always spoken of turbine in the singular, but in fact there’s more than one. “The approval is valid until the turbines are returned as required. There are a total of six turbines that are scheduled for maintenance,” the Minister’s press secretary, Keean Nembhard, said on Sunday.

As soon as the equipment arrives in Germany, Siemens Energy will ship it to Russia “as soon as possible,” a company spokeswoman said The press. For this transfer to Russian territory, he has to obtain an additional exemption, this time from the sanctions of the European Union.

On the website of the Embassy of Russia in Canada we did not specify. “We have always viewed the turbine issue as a bilateral matter between Canada and Germany. »

But this is a solution that is “useful and advantageous for Europe’s natural gas supply,” we pleaded in an email on Sunday evening.

  • Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

    PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

    Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

  • Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

    PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

    Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

  • Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

    PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

    Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

  • Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

    PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

    Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

  • Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

    PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

    Demonstration in front of the Siemens office in Montreal against the delivery of six turbines for the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 1 to Germany

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The Angry Canadian-Ukrainian Community

For weeks, the Canadian-Ukrainian community had begged the Trudeau government not to bow.

And on Sunday, opponents of sending the turbines staged protests in Montreal and Ottawa. On the Montreal side, we gathered in front of City Hall and Siemens Canada facilities, Chemin de la Côte-de-Liesse.


PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

Ukraine’s Honorary Consul in Montreal, Eugène Czolij, was present at the demonstration on Sunday.

“Canada passed a resolution in the House of Commons on April 27 that Russia was committing genocide in Ukraine,” Ukraine’s Honorary Consul in Montreal, Eugène Czolij, recalled, alongside a crowd where dozens of Canadian-Ukrainians had gathered at the edge of a highway exit.

” [Le Canada] must therefore do everything possible and impossible to prevent such exceptions and not give in to Russian blackmail,” he said.


PHOTO SARKA VANCUROVA, THE PRESS

Michael Swech, President of the Quebec Branch of the Ukrainian-Canadian Congress

At his side, President of the Québec Section of the Congress of Ukrainian Canadians, Michael Swech, recalled that many Ukrainians consider Canada their country’s “greatest ally”, hence their disappointment with the Trudeau government’s decision.

“It makes no sense, it undoes everything they’ve done [jusqu’ici] ‘ regrets Mr. Swech, recalling that Russia would use the money earned thanks to this equipment ‘to buy weapons and bombs’.

Nadia Vakhranova arrives to demonstrate her opposition to Canada’s decision and is concerned about the fate of her parents who are still in Ukraine. “I wonder every day if they’re still alive,” she breathed between two encouraging horns sounded by cars passing in front of the troupe.

The conservatives castigate the liberals

The Conservative Party criticized the transition to the sanctions regime against the Kremlin and took the opportunity to reiterate that the solution to the energy disruption caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine lies in infrastructure construction on Canadian soil.

“Rather than ignoring global sanctions aimed at punishing Putin, the Liberal government should approve new liquefied natural gas pipelines and terminals so Canadian natural gas can replace Russia’s energy supply in Europe,” said a trio of preservatives.

“Permit the return [des turbines] The gas strike sets a dangerous precedent by bowing to Putin’s blackmail on Europe and will negatively impact Canada’s position on the world stage,” MPs Pierre Paul-Hus, Michael Chong and James Bezan continued.

The owner of the 1,200-kilometer pipeline between Russia and Germany, Gazprom, is on Canada’s list of companies targeted by economic sanctions. The company argued that without the Montreal-sourced equipment, a reduction in volume was inevitable. This argument is controversial.

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