Jean Charest will take over the Conservative Party “as is” if elected

Political parties are living institutions [qui] are values ​​based and there are conservative values ​​that I believe inhe said Thursday afternoon in an interview with Patrice Roy, ICI RDI.

But political parties, as living institutions, change over timecontinued Mr. Charest, after whom Each leader marks the party.

The CCP too further developed [sous Erin O’Toole] and I will take it as it is when I become chiefhe explained.

Mr. Charest also claims to defend the same ideas in the west of the country, where the party’s electoral base is, as in Quebec, the province he led from 2003 to 2012.

What I am proposing, after all the experiences I have had in politics, are things that I deeply believe in. So it’s not true that I will do or say things just to try to please. »

A quote from Jean Charest, candidate for leadership of the PCC

In an interview on January 21, 2020, Jean Charest confirmed to Patrice Roy that he had seriously considered running to succeed Andrew Scheer.

However, he had decided not to run. The party has changed a lot since 1998he explained. I have issues on which I naturally have principles, such as the environment, but also social issues on which I have taken a stand.

Two years later, the former Quebec Premier is officially in the running. He is currently one of six candidates certified by the CCP with Pierre Poilievre, Leslyn Lewis, Patrick Brown, Roman Baber and Scott Aitchison.

No fewer than five other candidates have also qualified for the April 19 first stage, namely Marc Dalton, Leona Alleslev, Joseph Bourgault, Grant Abraham and Joel Etienne. They have until Friday to collect the 500 signatures and $300,000 needed to certify their candidacy.

recruitment, where everything is played

Although Pierre Poilievre is commonly referred to as the “favourite”, Jean Charest reminds that Conservative Party members voting by post this summer by a preferential vote and points out that in the last two lead races in 2017 and 2020 the leader lost.

000cartes, [Erin] O’Toole 20000, Leslyn Lewis 10000et l’autre [Derek Sloan] 10000, a-t-il rappelé. Tout le jeu se fera dans cette mécanique: cette logique d’un bulletin préférentiel, où il y a un premier, un deuxième, un troisième choix.”,”text”:”À la dernière course, Peter MacKay avait vendu 30000cartes, [Erin] O’Toole 20000, Leslyn Lewis 10000et l’autre [Derek Sloan] 10000, a-t-il rappelé. Tout le jeu se fera dans cette mécanique: cette logique d’un bulletin préférentiel, où il y a un premier, un deuxième, un troisième choix.”}}”>At the last race, Peter MacKay had sold 30,000 tickets, [Erin] O’Toole 20,000, Leslyn Lewis 10,000 and the others [Derek Sloan] 10,000, he recalled. The whole game is played in this mechanic: this logic of a preferential choice, where there is a first, a second, a third choice.

According to Jean Charest, it’s down to recruitment everything is played. And with the big campaigns going on, Poilievre is making rallies; Leslyn Lewis makes churches; Patrick Brown, he makes cultural communities, privately […]; and I, I make land and I make contenthe mentioned.

Jean Charest defends his environmental policy.

Photo: Radio Canada / Ivanoh Demers

Replace the “carbon tax” with the “carbon exchange”

In terms of content, Jean Charest defended his environmental policy on Thursday, in which he proposes himself by nameAbolition of the CO2 tax Liberal.

What I’m saying is there’s going to be a price for carbon, there’s going to be a price for carbon, but for big emitters, and that’s what we have and what I’ve done in Quebec with the system we put in place with California , the carbon exchangehe explained.

There is no excise tax in Quebecreminded Mr. Charest, but rather a tax on large issuers. So I propose to take a similar approach at the Canadian level.

The latest reports from the Federal Environment Commissioner, presented on Tuesday, to confirm Furthermore that more needs to be done with large issuershe added.

For revitalizing the LNG Quebec project

On the subject of pipeline construction, Mr Charest, like his main opponent, insists that he [respecterait] Skills Provinces that are against. However, the war in Ukraine, which exposed Europe’s dependence on Russian hydrocarbons, was a turning point, he said.

Québec, dans le Saguenay. […] Il y a un contexte qui a quand même changé, qui est différent de celui que nous avions au moment où les décisions ont été prises”,”text”:”Prenons un projet comme GNLQuébec, dans le Saguenay. […] Il y a un contexte qui a quand même changé, qui est différent de celui que nous avions au moment où les décisions ont été prises”}}”>Let’s take a project like GNL Québec in Saguenay. […] However, a context has changed that is different from what we had when the decisions were madeargues Mr. Charest, referring to the Legault government’s rejection of the project last summer.

And it’s still cruel to hear the news every night on Radio Canada [et] to see the Europeans indirectly funding the Russians to invade Ukraine by buying their gas and oil when we could be an ethical supplier to that markethe said.

Canada should draw others too lessons of the war in Ukraine, according to Jean Charest, who regret that Canada has let go of their investments in matters of national defense, when it comes to sovereignty.

In particular, he proposes building two military bases in the Arctic, including a deep-water port, to protect against neighboring Russia.

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